Rules & FAQs

Safety and Fun are always our top priorities at Scotsgrove! We are proud to be a horseman’s barn and promote horseback riding in a positive safe environment. With that in mind, some of our rules may come across as strict, but this is to keep our riders safe. Thank you!

If you are ever unsure or have a question don’t hesitate to ASK LESLIE or one of the instructors! We love questions and want to help!

General Barn Rules

  1. NO smoking or alcohol on the grounds – this is a HUGE fire and safety hazard, but even more so around horses and hay.
  2. Closed-toed shoes are required within the barn, most importantly when horses are being tacked and mounted.
  3. Hard Hats are required for all riders when mounted at all times.
  4. No running in the barn or towards a horse – this can spook a horse.
  5. Do not drive over the barn lawn – that is the location of the septic tank.

Payment

  1. We take cash or check. We do not take any cards at this time.
  2. If you pay in cash – please give this directly to an instructor with the rider’s name attached. A labeled envelope is great!
  3. If you pay with a check – please make sure the rider’s name is somewhere on the check.

Cancellations

  • Please give us 4 or more hours notice if you must cancel. Otherwise we will have to charge for a no-show. It takes an instructor (or sometimes two!) to bring in your horse, tack it up, and prepare for a larger lesson.
By Emie McGee

By Emie McGee

Practice Ride Rules
Practice rides are available for students who may have to catch, groom and tack a horse. Plus they must be able to ride with limited supervision in the ring. This is a time where you are taking charge of your own horsemanship. This includes taking care of your tack and your horse.

  1. You must be “Leslie Approved”- this means the rider and their guardian must talk with Leslie before coming in to practice ride to check availability of an appropriate horse and whether the rider is ready to ride with limited supervision.
  2. Practice rides are $15.00 or the rider can clean their tack and what tack is on the cleaning hook instead!
  3. You must be able to tack up your horse by yourself – you can of course ask an instructor to check your tack!
  4. No Jumping or Trail Rides without an instructor – practice riders may be invited to join a lesson trail ride for no further charge.
  5. Minors must be supervised at all times – this can include instructors, parents, and/or barn staff.
  6. We encourage finding a practice riding buddy – riding with a friend is always more fun!
  7. Practice rides are only allowed in the ring for about 30 minutes – but be sure to allow extra time to take care of your tack and horse!
  8. Clean up after yourself and your horse – this includes cleaning the tack you used, scooping up any accidents your horse may have made in the cross-ties, and putting your horse back out to pasture if possible.

Being in the Audience – parents and siblings
Sometimes it’s hard to contain siblings or maybe a parent wants their own nature time, here are some things to consider when you aren’t the one riding.

  1. Under the pecan tree is one of the best spots on Scotsgrove, one of our barn family members made the super comfortable benches and everyone is welcome to sit and watch the lesson from here.
  2. Everyone is welcome to explore the grounds around the barn and pet any horses within the barn – though we ask younger children to be accompanied.
  3. Please keep loud or flying objects to a minimum – horns, frisbees, and footballs can spook a horse!
  4. You are welcome to take a nature walk on the closer barn trails, but do so with the expectation you may see a trail ride group come by! Don’t hide, and speak up so we know where you are.
  5. NO swimming or wading in the pond. It goes very deep, very fast and there are snapping turtles and snakes (like any natural pond!).
  6. It may seem silly, but please keep children from destroying Ms. Leslie’s flowers. They are planted beside the large log jump on the barn lawn, around the benches, and around the security light pole.
By AliceKay McMillan

By AliceKay McMillan